Ordering a repeat prescription

 

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Online Access

Order your repeat prescription online at a time that suits you.

Your details and information are protected by the highest standards of online security, so all you need to worry about is what to do with the spare time you’ve earnt.

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Repeat Prescriptions

If you need to order a prescription from us, you can do so in the following ways:

  • Order in person at our reception desk.
  • Order on paper: you can either use the right-hand side of your previous prescription (which lists all of your repeat medication from which you can choose those you wish to order) or use a prescription order sheet available at the front desk, then put your request in our repeat prescription box in our waiting area.
  • Online via Patient Access
  • Online via The NHS App

We can only issue a medication request if you have previously been issued that medication by us, and you have had it recently.

We do not take prescription requests over the phone.

Please allow 72 working hours for a prescription to be processed and ready for collection.

repeat prescriptions

If you run out of medication we will deal with your request as urgent ONLY if the medication you are taking is deemed URGENT. The doctors have provided us with a list of these medications. It is important that you order your repeat medication on time.

In line with government medicines management rules, we do not prescribe medication that can be brought over the counter (pharmacy, supermarket etc) This eases the burden on an already over-stretched NHS.

In the year prior to June 2017, the NHS spent approximately £569 million on prescriptions for medicines which can be purchased over the counter from a pharmacy and other outlets such as supermarkets.

These prescriptions include items for a condition:

  • That is considered to be self-limiting and so does not need treatment as it will heal of its own accord;
  • Which lends itself to self-care, i.e. that the person suffering does not normally need to seek medical care but may decide to seek help with symptom relief from a local pharmacy and use an over the counter medicine.

Vitamins/minerals and probiotics have also been included in the consultation proposals as items of limited clinical effectiveness which are of high cost to the NHS.